Pregnancy Question: lack of understanding about discrimination law

Many employers think it is reasonable to ask female job applicants if they plan to have children, figures published by the Equality and Human Rights Commission suggest. The commission says many employers need more support to understand the basics of discrimination law.

The commission, a non-departmental public body, surveyed 1,106 senior decision-makers in business. Over a third (36%) think it is reasonable to ask female job applicants about their future plans to have children. Six in 10 employers think a woman should disclose if she is pregnant during the recruitment process. Almost half (46%) think it is reasonable to ask female candidates if they have young children. Nearly half (44%) of respondents think women should work for an organisation for at least a year before deciding to have children. Around a third believe that women who become pregnant and new mothers are generally less interested in career progression than others in the company.

Rebecca Hilsenrath, the commission’s chief executive, said the findings represent a ‘depressing reality that, when it comes to the rights of pregnant women and new mothers in the workplace, we are still living in the dark ages. We should all know very well that it is against the law not to appoint a woman because she is pregnant or might become pregnant. Yet we also know that women routinely get asked questions around family planning in interviews’.

She added: ‘It’s clear that many employers need more support to better understand the basics of discrimination law and the rights of pregnant women and new mothers.’

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